This is from Hampton’s “New Movements in Be-Bop” album (1947) which is a real treasure of the initial be-bop storm that was happening in New York in the 40s. Featuring a young, hungry Charles Mingus on bass playing his own composition, the futuristic “Mingus Fingers”, Hamp’s orchestra is as spirited, and tight, as ever.

 

Lionel Hampton - Mingus Fingers

Such a great great jumpy blues, a hopper and a skipper for them alive ones; tappin’ away on repeat at home, too. Crudup outdoes Elvis by some 10 years. Made in Chicago.

Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup, voice  & guitar

Melvin Draper, drums

December, 1944

Arthur %22Big Boy%22 Crudup - Who's Been Foolin You 78rpm

 

 

This is a Greek Decca, #4056. “O riQProE” is my English alphabet translation of the Greek title. I have no clue about any of the information on this label, unfortunately.

But the tune is a wonderful Greek folk-dance number, almost like a very sophisticated waltz; with harmonized vocals, compound rhythms and perfect string interplay.

Greek Decca 4056 - %22O riqproe%22 78rpm

Red Foley was born in 1910 to  a musical family from Blue Lick,Kentucky, and by 1930 he was touring around America as a singer with the John Lair Cumberland Ridge Runners. His 1951 version of “Peace in the Valley” was one of the first-ever-million-selling gospel hits. Throughout his recording life he sold more than twenty-five million 78s and is an important figure in the history of country music.

He was also a big inspiration for a couple of future rock n’ rollers named Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis Presley, both playing many of Red’s songs; and both absorbing Red’s country boogie style which would be the foundation of all that 50s Sun Records rock-a-billy.

Lately, I havin’ been really digging his version of the little remembered Bob Russel tune “Church Music.” On the Decca label from 1950, the melody is catchy and Foley’s baritone/tenor voice sounds so good around this simple, genuine ditty.

Red Foley – Church Music <<PLAY

Bob, Joe and Merle were the Shelton Brothers. As country musicians, they were popular enough in the 1930’s through the 1960’s to “cut” over 150 sides, and a good number of those were steady poppin’ and boppin’ just like this one. Look these dudes up.

From the Decca label, 1939.

Shelton Bros. – If You Don’t Like my Peaches (Leave my Tree Alone)<<PLAY